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Tuscumbia

Manager: Jimmy Drewery

Directions
Tuscumbia is located in Alcorn County near Corinth. From Corinth, take Hwy 72 West. Turn north onto Alcorn Rd and go past the hospital. At the fork just north of the hospital, bear left. Turn right at concrete bridge onto County Road 750. The headquarters building is 2 miles on the left. If you have any questions regarding Tuscumbia call (662) 487-1946.

Additional Resources

 

Description
Tuscumbia Wildlife Management Area (TWMA) is comprised of approximately 2,600 acres of state owned land located in northern Alcorn County, approximately three miles west and northwest of Corinth, MS.  This is a relatively new area, established in 1999.  The TWMA is split into two separate blocks of land known as Unit 1 (1400 ac.) and Unit 2 (1200 ac.) for management purposes. 

Unit 1, the northern most block of land, is primarily swamp bottomland with limited access by foot and boat.  This unit is best accessed by launching a boat into the Tuscumbia River Channel from the boat ramp located on County Road 750 (Smith Bridge Road).  Only a small portion of Unit 1 on the northeast corner is accessible to the public for land access.  The remainder of the area is surrounded by private property.  

The primary species hunted on Unit 1 is waterfowl.  The majority of this area is inundated with water during the winter months.  The habitat type is marsh wetland with sparse cypress, Tupelo gum, and willow as the dominant tree species.  Hazel alder and button bush comprise most of the low cover and there are numerous species of aquatic plants that provide the bulk of the food for waterfowl.  Unit 1 remains a challenge for any type of habitat manipulation due to the limited access and low, swampy topography.  This unit has, however, very good waterfowl habitat and is heavily used by duck hunters.  An underutilized resource of this unit is fishing in the old Tuscumbia River run which exists as a dead water slough unless masked by high water conditions.

The southern block of land, Unit 2, was mostly abandoned agricultural fields before the waterfowl impoundments were created.  This unit is easily accessible from road frontage along U.S. Hwy 72 and Alcorn County road 750.  Seven waterfowl impoundments ranging from 19 to 83 acres, totaling 258 acres, have been constructed and are managed for waterfowl habitat.  After having been closed to all hunting and trespassing for three years (2003-2005), this unit is now open to waterfowl hunting on a limited draw hunt basis (see Area Regulations for details and application process).  The waterfowl impoundments are planted in Japanese millet, browntop millet, sorghum, and Egyptian wheat to attract wintering waterfowl.  Draw hunts for waterfowl begin on the Saturday nearest Dec. 15 each year and are held on each Saturday and Wednesday thereafter.  Hunters drawn are also randomly assigned to one of the impoundments and may bring 3 guests for a party of 4.  The hunt parties must check in and out at the area headquarters.  A stand-by drawing is held to fill vacancies when drawn participants do not check in by 5:30 am.  Shooting hours are ½ hour before sunrise until 12:00 noon. 

Unit 2 also has some good deer and rabbit habitat and limited hunting opportunity (scheduled around waterfowl hunting) is being allowed.  There are several winter food plots planted in wheat, oats, and clover for these species.  Only archery deer hunting is allowed prior to the waterfowl draw hunt season and rabbit hunting is allowed during February.

This WMA has excellent birding opportunities based on the variety of habitat types.  Many species of marsh birds benefit from the management practices implemented for waterfowl.  Some of the marsh birds that are frequently sighted are great blue heron, green heron, American bittern, rail, purple gallinule and egrets.  On Unit 2, approximately 240 acres of upland pasture were planted in a variety of oak seedlings in 2000 and now provide cover and nesting habitat for a variety of songbirds that thrive in early vegetative succession situations.  There are also small blocks of mature hardwoods adjoining these reforested areas that provide good birding access.  Bluebird and wood duck nest boxes are erected throughout the area and provide good photography opportunities.



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